Assignment help! Nurse leader/manager interview

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of barr31524 barr31524 8 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #104568
    Profile photo of barr31524
    barr31524
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    Hello all, I am in my final semester and have to do an interview assignment for a leadership course. Unfortunately, I do not currently work in the field so it makes it difficult to find my own interviewees….

    I need 1 identified nurse leader and 1 nurse manager to please answer these same provided questions in an interview style, no personal information will be shared, only response content. (You can just list 1,2,3, ect.) The answers don’t have to be long. I would really appreciate the help and look forward to comparing these two important sides to nursing. Thanks!

    1.Tell me a little bit about yourself.How long have you been a nurse?In which areas of nursing have you practiced?

    2. Who inspired you to be the kind of ___________ (leader/manager) you are today? Why did you select that person?

    3. What are the most important values you demonstrate in your role as a nurse ___________ (leader/manager)? How do you measure your success?

    4. How do you motivate people?

    5. Describe the work environment that has allowed you to experience the most success.

    6. If a significant change needed to be implemented within your work environment, how would you acquire support? How do you deal with complications and resistance related to change?

    7. How do you handle conflict? Provide an example of a situation you were involved in and describe how you addressed it.

    8. What is your short-term and long-term vision for your followers/employees?

    9. How important is diversity in the workplace? Have you encountered any benefits or challenges related to diversity?

    10. What values guide your decision-making?

    11. What is the biggest challenge facing __________ (leaders/managers) today?

    12. What does it mean to be a leader/manager in today’s ever-changing health care environment?

    13. Final thoughts/comments related to nursing leadership and management

    #104581

    Call me and I will give you a phone interview. I have been a RN for 30 years. I have taught nursing, worked in nursing administration, done peduatric nursing, have my Masters in Nursing, and have a son going into nursing.
    Darin Johnson, RN, MSN
    951-616-4260.

    #104588
    Profile photo of Robert.CFRN
    Robert.CFRN
    Member

    1.Tell me a little bit about yourself.How long have you been a nurse?In which areas of nursing have you practiced?

    Nurse for 21 years. ICU nurse and clinical manager, house administrator full and part time for all of that, flight nurse past 13 years including 3 years managing an air medical base. Army Nurse Corps officer with 1 year tour in Iraq. Served as Chief Flight Nurse and assistant officer in charge of Emergency Section of a Combat Support Hospital in Iraq. Also served as unit training officer and company commander. Now retired from the Army.

    2. Who inspired you to be the kind of ___________ (leader/manager) you are today? Why did you select that person?

    Many different people. As far as leaders, Ronald Reagan, Paul the Apostle, Dale Carnegie, etc. I learned leadership in the Army, where leaders were the first up, the last to eat, and the last to go to sleep. The troops are cared for first, leaders last.

    3. What are the most important values you demonstrate in your role as a nurse ___________ (leader/manager)? How do you measure your success?

    Fairness above all. Reward hard work. When people are failing, make sure they have the tools they need to succeed. Support them with good training and quality materials. When people are just plain jerks, provide them the opportunity to find another employer. Toxic employees can destroy a unit.

    4. How do you motivate people?

    Trust and release. Nothing kills motivation like micro-management. At the same time, laissez-faire leadership doesn’t work. Positive reinforcement and constructive criticism combined with good training are keys.

    5. Describe the work environment that has allowed you to experience the most success.

    Flight nursing is a profession with much competition, and a high degree of autonomy. Flight crews are the elite of our profession (usually), so micromanagement isn’t even a remote thought. Managing a flight base forces someone to be a manager, PR person, politician and teacher. You’re located miles from your administrative offices, and rarely see your superiors. Base managers in our company were given much leeway in running our bases.

    6. If a significant change needed to be implemented within your work environment, how would you acquire support? How do you deal with complications and resistance related to change?

    Education education education. Employees must be given ownership of change, and have input. They must have the training to be able to implement the new policies or procedures comfortably and competently. If that doesn’t work and people are still resisting, hospitals are not democracies. There is a time to politely issue orders.

    7. How do you handle conflict? Provide an example of a situation you were involved in and describe how you addressed it.

    If two employees are having conflict, bring them into a room together and have it talked out. Conflict is often because of misunderstanding. If an employee comes to you with a grievance against another, don’t believe it outright. Every story has two sides. An employee at my base was simply a jerk who had a grudge against a female employee. He frequently trash talked, and sometimes lied. Progressive counseling didn’t work. He would get better, then go back to his old ways. Bringing them into a room to talk things out didn’t work. His services were no longer required.

    8. What is your short-term and long-term vision for your followers/employees?

    In order to provide high quality patient care, the single most important thing is to take care of your people. Good training, adequate staffing and a supportive work environment not only helps your employees, but your patients. Happy nurses provide better care. More, it actually ends up costing less because of reduced staff turnover. Your job as a leader is to do everything you can to make your people succeed, even if it means them moving up and you losing them.

    9. How important is diversity in the workplace? Have you encountered any benefits or challenges related to diversity?

    It’s not politically correct to say, but I really don’t care about diversity. I care about competence. I don’t care what color, sex, religion, sexual orientation or national origin a person is. If he or she provides compassionate, high quality patient care, then I will do everything that I can to make sure that that person is a success. I do not hire or make decisions based on anything other than attitude and competence.

    10. What values guide your decision-making?

    Integrity, quality and compassion. Dale Carnegie’s book “How to Win Friends and Influence People” should be every manager’s guide. Being sent to the Carnegie Institute’s leadership training by my company was very helpful.

    11. What is the biggest challenge facing __________ (leaders/managers) today?

    Grossly incompetent nursing and hospital administrations who strain at every dollar. Their inability to see past an excel spreadsheet leads to micromanaging, low morale, and high turnover. They’re out of touch with bedside nurses. This ends up costing the hospital millions because of the high turnover, cost of overtime, cost of agency and traveling nurses, and lowered revenues because of lower patient satisfaction scores.

    12. What does it mean to be a leader/manager in today’s ever-changing health care environment?

    You’re screwed. I would never manage a hospital ICU these days. House administrator in a facility that self-destructed because of administrative incompetence was hard enough.

    13. Final thoughts/comments related to nursing leadership and management

    It’s all about your employees. Look up Richard Branson. He got it right. You don’t take care of your patients first. It’s about taking care of your employees. Employees who are valued, supported, well-trained and rewarded for excellence will go to the ends of the Earth for you, and for their patients. Employees are happy, patients receive better care and it actually decreases costs and increases revenue for your facility.

    #104620
    Profile photo of barr31524
    barr31524
    Member

    Thanks so much for responding to my post, this is a huge help. You have a lot of great experience and wisdom to offer and I truly enjoy your realistic views on the topic at hand, not just writing what everyone would expect a leaders/managers answers to be. So again, thank you and this information will go to great use to me and my fellow classmates. Have a great day!

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