Became disabled after MVA, What now?

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of qestout qestout 3 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #10493

    I have been an RN for over 25 years. In December 2005, I was hit by a car whose occupants sadly died as a result of the crash. Every bone on the right side of my body was fractured. After 3 weeks and 7 surgeries on an open communated tib/fib fracture I was released home. My daughter was also injured and in a body cast for over 6 weeks. After a year in a wheelchair, another 5 surgeries, the last being a fusion of my right ankle, leaving my right leg over an inch shorter than my left, and an ankylosed right elbow, I was told to apply for disability, I was approved and have been on it since. Last year after being so tired of being what I described as useless, I decided to go back to college and get a degree in Medical Coding/ HIT. I took classes that I needed to have before entering the program, and went to see the Director of the program who informed me that I was too “handicapped” to get into the program due to the physical requirements. I am heart broken. What do I do now? I want to be a productive person. I don’t want to depend on a monthly check from the government, even though I paid into the system for years. Please, does anyone have any suggestions? I would be so grateful. I have an Associates Degree so alot of things I could do in an office, I am not qualified to do.

    #10502
    Profile photo of Anne
    Anne
    Member

    Do you still have your RN license? Do you still want to be a RN? I am not sure what you mean by having an associates degree so you are not qualified to work in an office. Are you thinking you need a BSN to work in an office? I don’t think that is true. Maybe I misunderstood you.

    Can you use a computer and a phone? I am not disabled, but I work from home as a telephone case manager for a drug company. The only physical qualifications are to be able to type and use the phone. It is a great job for some one who is an experienced nurse.
    I am also confused about the physical requirements to be a coder. If this is something you would like to do, I would see if the college you were looking at could be convinced that they should accept you and find ways for you succeed. I know many people in wheelchairs who have earned college degrees and who work full time. Sounds like the school needs a little education on the Americans with Disabilities Act and how they need to make accommodations for you. Let us know what happens!

    #10503
    Profile photo of Anne
    Anne
    Member

    I broke my leg and was in a wheel chair for 8 weeks and was able to work as an RN in a busy medical office. It can be done!

    #10509
    Profile photo of jesi13star
    jesi13star
    Member

    What about insurance companies? They are always looking to hire experienced RNs for case work.

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