Technology good or bad?

Home Forums Nurse to Nurse Advice Technology good or bad?

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Jason Hautala RN Jason Hautala RN 3 years, 8 months ago.

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #12486

    It seems like the more technology we incorporate into nursing, the less nursing I actually do. Most of my day is spent typing into an electronic record (or waiting for the computer to turn on.) Before electronic monitors in every room, I actually had to touch the patient to get a heart rate and blood pressure, now I can just input the numbers from the computer out at the desk.

    I used to be pretty good at listening to lung sounds and heart tones, but I hardly bother now, as they are going to be getting a chest xray, if not a CT scan.

    Anyone else frustrated that we are moving in the wrong direction?

    #12577
    Profile photo of katy_rn
    katy_rn
    Member

    I’m frustrated that nurses are allowing technology to determine their practice. We still have control over the way we choose to practice. Yes, technology is inevitable, but we still make the choice to go assess our patients physically. Shame on the nurses who “click” to record a vital sign without auscultating, palpating, and LOOKING at their patient. Technology isn’t always the problem, but rather nurses. Not all nurses practice in this manner, thank goodness. But for those that do, review your practice. Is the technology the problem, or you? Just thoughts as I watch others practice in our profession, which is ever changing. We can’t fight change, but embrace it and strive to continued nursing practice that is incorporated with technology- not controlled by it.

    #12579

    katy_rn: that is a very good point, and I could be guilty of that occasionally myself …. but in my own defense, and those in similar situations, I used to spend 10% of my shift charting and the rest of my shift taking care of the patients. Now it seems like it takes more time to chart than it does to perform any given task, not to mention all of the defensive charting and “meaningful use” charting we are required to do now.

    The charting increases are mandatory, so something has to give someplace, and it comes down to less time available to actually spend with patients. There is a place for technology, but I believe the graph making pencil pushers have destroyed nursing with the EMR.

    #12583
    Profile photo of katy_rn
    katy_rn
    Member

    Don’t get me wrong moderator, I am not saying that technology doesn’t have its faults. We have a LONG way to go before it is done well. Think of how many times the Wright brothers had to crash and fail before they were able to fly. The EMR has a long way to go too! It truly has taken over our nursing time in a lot of ways. However, you cannot deny that EMR has proliferated the nursing epidemic of not knowing, or caring, how to properly assess a patient. I truly am worried for our young nurses starting out in the profession. They are not lazy, like some in our profession, but merely victims of technology. I feel very grateful that our CNO is looking into this very issue and how we can make improvements to charting so we are back with more time at the bedside-where we need to be. I still stand firm on reviewing your practice if you are one that “clicks” before you assess. Hopefully, this technology plane will take flight soon!

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 5 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Skip to toolbar